More Than One Prostate Cancer in a Single Prostate?

As many as 40% of newly diagnosed PCa patients have unifocal disease, that is, just one focus of cancer. But that still leaves 60-80% of patients with multifocal PCa. Without evidence to the contrary, multiple foci in the same gland were thought to be biologically homogeneous, that is, identical to each other.

Then, along came the tools to analyze PCa at the molecular level, bringing new knowledge of the biology of PCa.

Read about this by clicking here.

How to train your bladder

If you experience a frequent urge to urinate—perhaps due to having an enlarged prostate if you’re a man, having given birth if you’re a woman, or having an “overactive bladder”—there may be a practical do-it-yourself solution to the problem, referred to as bladder training. It’s worth a try before resorting to medication or surgical procedures.

Read more at berkeleywellness.com HERE

Can Hormone Therapy Make Prostate Cancer Worse?

Scientists at Cedars-Sinai have discovered how prostate cancer can sometimes withstand and outwit a standard hormone therapy, causing the cancer to spread. Their findings also point to a simple blood test that may help doctors predict when this type of hormone therapy resistance will occur.  Learn more about these interesting findings by clicking HERE.

What are Some Other Causes for a High PSA?

So you’ve had your PSA test, and it came back high. Your doctor did a DRE and ran a few more tests, and assures you that prostate cancer is very unlikely. Still, you’re worried. What are some other causes of a high PSA?

Read about this in the Prostate Care Foundation blog HERE

Hydrogel spacer use during prostate radiation therapy – Community Experience

Reported in Urology Times:

For urologists and radiation oncologists alike, when treating prostate cancer, one recurring theme is “protect the rectum.” As surgeons, we learn meticulous techniques to avoid rectal injuries, and our radiation colleagues have long strategized on how to optimally deliver the maximum dose of tolerable radiation while minimizing radiation exposure to “organs at risk” such as the bladder, rectum, urethra, and penile bulb. In this era of dose escalation and hypofractionation, rectal toxicity is of paramount consideration.

In this article, we discuss one particular new product and how it may herald a significant change in the landscape of radiation therapy for prostate cancer.

Read the entire article on urologytimes.com HERE

Clinical Trials Using Enzalutamide (Xtandi)

Enzalutamide (XTANDI) is a prescription medicine used to treat men with prostate cancer that no longer responds to a medical or surgical treatment that lowers testosterone.  XTANDI is now approved to treat men with prostate cancer that no longer responds to treatment that lowers testosterone and has not spread to other parts of the body. This is also known as non-metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC).

This web page, published by the National Cancer Institute, lists the clinical trials using Enzalutamide.  Click here to view the article.