FDA approves lower dose of cabazitaxel in treatment of mCRPC

In line with previously reported data, the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the used of a 20 mg/ml dose of cabazitaxel (Jevtana) in the treatment of men with metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). However, the use of this dose of cabazitaxel is currently approved only for men who have previously been treated with docetaxel-based chemotherapy.

Read more here on Prostate Cancer InfoLink

Event: Exciting Advances in Prostate Cancer

Stanford Health Care Community Event

Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers in men and has a high success rate if caught early. Join Stanford Medicine doctors as they discuss the latest screening, diagnostic tools and treatment advancements. Meet Stanford Medicine prostate cancer experts and get your questions answered.

Saturday, September 9, 2017
9:30 a.m. – 11 a.m.

SPEAKERS

Andrei Iagaru, MD
Radiologist

Sumit Shah, MD
Medical Oncologist

Geoffrey Sonn, MD
Urologic Oncologist

Patrick Swift, MD
Radiation Oncologist

Register by clicking here: Stanford Health Care in the Community

Nutrition and Prostate Cancer

Presentation by Greta Macaire, RD on Answer Cancer Foundation

Diet, exercise and stress, three very powerful components to manage prostate that are within our own control. Studies in the past 10 years have provided significant empirical support for the role of diet and nutrition.

UCSF, its clinicians and researchers have been in the forefront of this effort. As well as personally consulting with thousands of prostate  cancer patients and their caregivers, Greta Macaire, the senior resident dietitian at UCSF Comprehensive Cancer Center, has presented monthly on nutrition and PCa for more than 10 years.

Her presentation will address:

  • Balanced diet and nutrition for living with prostate cancer
  • Weight management during treatment
  • Diet and nutrition changes when in treatment
  • Healthy eating and recipes
  • Nausea and appetite problems

Listen to the presentation by clicking here

Presentation slides can be downloaded from here

Us TOO Prostate Cancer Clinical Trial Finder

The approved treatments for prostate cancer available today were made possible because patients participated in clinical trials. Through clinical trials, doctors find new and better ways to prevent, detect, diagnose, control, and treat illnesses.

However, finding an appropriate clinical trial can be challenging. We encourage you to simplify the process with The Us TOO Prostate Cancer Clinical Trial Finder, a free and confidential service that provides an efficient, user-friendly, customized approach to identify clinical trials relevant for each individual prostate cancer patient.

Read more and access the Us TOO Prostate Cancer Clinical Trial Finder

Active Surveillance: Protecting Patients From Harm by Laurence Klotz

There are few physicians around the world who have as much experience in managing men on active surveillance as Dr. Klotz and his colleagues at the Sunnybrook Center near Toronto, Canada. They have built their experience carefully over time. They have carefully integrated and studied the value of techniques like multi-parametric MRI scans, MRI-guided and MRI/TRUS fusion-guided biopsies, molecular testing, etc. into the management protocols that they use.
Klotz and his colleagues continue to believe that active surveillance can still be a reasonable option for many patients with “favorable” forms of intermediate-risk prostate cancer, especially if they have other co-morbid conditions that could lead to their deaths within the next 10 to 15 years.

Watch video on www.urotoday.com

Overview of PET/CT Imaging in Recurrent Prostate Cancer – Current and Emerging Techniques

Fabio Almeida, MD // Phoenix Molecular Imaging – Phoenix Insight Imaging/CDI

Over the last few years, we have seen tremendous activity in the area of molecular imaging for prostate cancer. Just about every day we have colleagues asking about the various PET/CT imaging tests – what is available? How do they compare? What are the parameters for successful imaging?

We are proud to be contributing to this body of knowledge. Our work regarding C11-Acetate PET/CT imaging in the recurrent PCa setting with relationship to PSA kinetics has been recently published. This represents the largest single-site evaluation of a molecular imaging agent. A link to the publication and brief overview PET/CT imaging for Prostate Cancer follow for your review. We hope you find this information useful.

Read or download the report from here

New UBC Website Walks Men Through Prostate Cancer Diagnosis, Treatment

The following information was obtained from several sources including University of British Columbia, The Vancouver Sun and others.

John Oliffe, head of Men’s Health Research and a professor in the School of Nursing has developed a new interactive website called “If I Were Tom” (ifiweretom.ubc.ca)

This website has been five years in the making. The idea started in 2012, when researchers surveyed health specialists and patients to find out what they most want to discuss when dealing with prostate cancer. Another two years of video interviews followed, using a $400,000.00 grant from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research. There are 30 videos on the website, with more ready to be swapped in order to keep everything fresh.

The website is interactive, so the viewer can predict what Tom (actor Gary Johnston plays the role) will do at each step along the way from diagnosis to recovery. “Will I have to wear these stupid underpants that make you look like you’re walking around with a load in your pants?” Tom asks himself when worrying about potential side effects of surgery.

“We’ve found with guys that if a character resonates with them they’re drawn into the content in a more interactive way. You look at the video and put in what you would do next. You might be plotting what Tom’s doing, but chances are you’re plotting what you did or think you’d do,” said Oliffe.

Like a support group session, but on line. There is already a mountain of information available about prostate cancer, concedes Oliffe, and the website isn’t trying to duplicate that. Instead, each topic area includes a video from specialists including urologist, oncologist and psychologist and also includes men with prostate cancer talking about their real experiences. It also includes no-holds-barred discussion on sexual problems and hormonal changes.

We’re really trying to create a resource that was similar for all those guys who don’t want to go to a group because of privacy issues or who can’t get there because of transportation or work commitments etc.

You can’t have too much information. There are different types of prostate cancer – slow growing or aggressive – there are various treatment options to treat prostate cancer including surgery to remove the prostate gland surgically.

Another option may be radiation therapy, anti-hormone treatment known as androgen deprivation therapy or doing something referred to as active-surveillance (where you and your PSA etc. are watched very closely and if and when things change then treatment options are offered). Age and other health problems will also play into each man’s choice of treatment.

“They might be disappointed with the outcome, but if you go in knowing the potential side effects and having thoughtfully considered those, taking time rather than being rushed…you’re less likely to make a decision quickly about a treatment you might regret.”

Research continues. Oliffe’s team is collecting more data through the website with surveys. I believe at the present time they are asking about a persons exercise regime.