Download Updated 2019 Prostate Cancer Patient Guide

Prostate Cancer Foundation’s goal is always to deliver the most cutting-edge treatments and information to families dealing with prostate cancer. As such, they have committed to updating the patient guide to reflect the very latest research and discoveries for patients. 

This is the second round of updates for 2019. Changes include:

  • Updated information on active surveillance
  • Revised guidance on when to start discussions of screening with physician aligned with NCCN recommendations (age 40 for African Americans, age 45 for average-risk men)
  • Additional details on indications for, and side effects of, second-generation anti-androgen drugs, including late-breaking approval of darolutamide for non-metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer
  • Expanded section on treatment of metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer
  • Information on commercially available genetic testing
  • Guidance on talking to your insurance company

Download an updated digital copy today and then be sure to provide feedback.

Triple Hormonal Blockade (ADT3): A Patient’s Perspective

Opinion Article by Charles Maack

The information in this article is a lengthy read, but for men moved to androgen deprivation therapy the information is extremely important to be aware since everything explained may be involved in their well-being.

Triple-hormonal blockade/androgen deprivation therapy (ADT3) includes the prescribing of:

  1. a LHRH/GnRH agonist or antagonist to shut down testicular testosterone production
  2. an antiandrogen to block testosterone access to the cancer cell nucleus
  3. a 5Alpha Reductase (5AR) inhibitor to prevent any testosterone that might access the cancer cell nucleus from converting to dihydrotestosterone/DHT

Read the entire article on oncogen.org HERE

AR-V7 Liquid Biopsy Coming of Age

Once a man is castrate resistant and moves on a second line hormone therapy drug like Zytiga or Xtandi (aka AR inhibitors) it is inevitable that the Zytiga or Xtandi will also become ineffective.

When this happens, the question that comes is what should be the next treatment?  Generally, the options currently available are either to move to the drug not initially used ( Zytiga if Xtandi was first used or Xtandi if Zytiga was used) or instead to use taxane chemotherapy (Taxotere aka docetaxel).

Knowing which of these two options is best has been nothing but guesswork.  But, things are improving.  There is an investigational test that detects the expression of a protein called AR-V7 in the nuclei of circulating tumor cells taken from a vial of blood cells (liquid biopsy).  This test can help guide this decision.

A recent study (published in JAMA Oncology) evaluating this test has shown that a blood test can detect the protein called AR-V7 in circulating tumor cells and that the presence of this protein accurately predicts how well certain men will respond to AR inhibitors (Zytiga and Xtandi).

Read the complete blog on CancerABCs.org HERE

FDA Approves Enzalutamide (Xtandi) for the treatment of non-metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (non-metastatic CRPC)

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved a new use for enzalutamide (Xtandi) for the treatment of non-metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (non-metastatic CRPC). Enzalutamide was previously approved only for patients with metastatic CRPC. Prior to this past February – when the FDA also approved apalutamide (Erleada) for non-metastatic CRPC – there were no FDA-approved treatments for these men.

Read more on PCF.org HERE

A Generic Version of Zytiga Has Been Approved by the FDA

It has just been recently announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved a generic version of Zytiga, the new drug’s name is Yonsa.  It is a novel formulation of abiraterone acetate that needs to be used in combination with methylprednisolone for the treatment of men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC).

Read the complete article on CancerABCs.org HERE