Can Hormone Therapy Make Prostate Cancer Worse?

Scientists at Cedars-Sinai have discovered how prostate cancer can sometimes withstand and outwit a standard hormone therapy, causing the cancer to spread. Their findings also point to a simple blood test that may help doctors predict when this type of hormone therapy resistance will occur.  Learn more about these interesting findings by clicking HERE.

FDA Approves Enzalutamide (Xtandi) for the treatment of non-metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (non-metastatic CRPC)

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved a new use for enzalutamide (Xtandi) for the treatment of non-metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (non-metastatic CRPC). Enzalutamide was previously approved only for patients with metastatic CRPC. Prior to this past February – when the FDA also approved apalutamide (Erleada) for non-metastatic CRPC – there were no FDA-approved treatments for these men.

Read more on PCF.org HERE

A Generic Version of Zytiga Has Been Approved by the FDA

It has just been recently announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved a generic version of Zytiga, the new drug’s name is Yonsa.  It is a novel formulation of abiraterone acetate that needs to be used in combination with methylprednisolone for the treatment of men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC).

Read the complete article on CancerABCs.org HERE

LuPSMA treatment (Lutetium-177 PSMA-617)​

An exciting proof-of-concept study of Lutetium-177 PSMA (Lu PSMA) was published in the journal Lancet Oncology. Lu-PSMA has been described as “a disruptive therapy and has the potential to change practice” in the future treatment of men with end-stage prostate cancer.

Lu-PSMA, a nuclear therapy, has been used in Germany for many years under compassionate use basis.  This particular study was conducted in Australia. The study results offer hope for men with end-stage prostate cancer who have exhausted all their treatment options.

Read more on Prostate Cancer Foundation HERE
and CancerABCs.org HERE
and SBS News HERE

Research finds ‘Achilles heel’ for aggressive prostate cancer. Drug makes prostate cancer cells self destruct

UC San Francisco researchers have discovered a promising new line of attack against lethal, treatment-resistant prostate cancer. Analysis of hundreds of human prostate tumors revealed that the most aggressive cancers depend on a built-in cellular stress response to put a brake on their own hot-wired physiology. Experiments in mice and with human cells showed that blocking this stress response with an experimental drug—previously shown to enhance cognition and restore memory after brain damage in rodents—causes treatment-resistant cancer cells to self-destruct while leaving normal cells unaffected.​

The new study was published online May 2, 2018 in Science Translational Medicine.​

Read the entire article on MedicalXpress.com HERE
and technologyneworks.com HERE

FDA approves apalutamide (Erleada) for the treatment of non-metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

February 14, 2018 – Today the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved apalutamide (Erleada, also previously called ARN-509) for the treatment of non-metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (non-metastatic CRPC). This clinical setting is when men who are being treated with Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) see their PSA levels begin to rise, but no metastases are visible yet on scans. There were previously no FDA-approved treatments for non-metastatic CRPC, and patients typically continued to receive ADT, despite its diminishing benefit.

To read more about this, click HERE.

Summary of State of Immunotherapy, especially Immune Checkpoint Inhibitors

By Ravi A. Madan, MD, and William L. Dahut, MD

Although immunotherapies are poised to permanently reshape treatment for bladder and kidney cancers, immune-based therapeutics research in prostate cancer has stagnated. There is immunotherapy available for prostate cancer, however, the delayed effects of treatment and the rare effect on prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels have generated less enthusiasm compared with the rapid and sustained responses in some patients with bladder and kidney cancers who have been treated with immune checkpoint inhibitors. In addition, recent negative results of some trials have raised more concerns about the lack of potential for immunotherapy in prostate cancer. Nonetheless, several ongoing studies of immune checkpoint inhibitor combinations are potentially defining a course for immunotherapy development.

Read the article here